america-wakiewakie:

Revealed: the Palestinian children killed by Israeli forces | The Telegraph 

More children than Palestinian fighters are being killed in Israel’s offensive on Gaza, according to the UN. Shown here are the name, age, and sex of 132 of those children, recorded by the Al Mezan Centre for Human Rights

http://acommunistsloth.tumblr.com/post/92590790127/blackmagicalgirlmisandry-trust-worthy-news

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

Trust worthy news outlets/blogs that report on the ongoing invasion of Gaza by Israel

- Middle East Monitor (x)

- Al Jazeera (x)

- The Electronic Intifada (x)

- Occupied Palestine (TW: graphic images of violence against children, blood, and dead…

chronically-rebellious:

tashabilities:

scorpysue:

thegabdonwrites:

liltranslady:

kittymanada:

student-for-an-anarchist-society:

does anyone even need to say anything more about israel?

You bet your sweet ass if China or Iran was doing this reporters would be able to find the word “sterilization,” which is conspicuously absent here.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Again. Israel!

:(

If you defend Israel, I don’t need to know you.

FORCED STERILIZATION IS NOT OKAY. Please signal boost so that people realize that forced sterilization wasn’t just something that happened in the US in the ’70s, but that it’s still going on now and it’s eugenics.

chronically-rebellious:

tashabilities:

scorpysue:

thegabdonwrites:

liltranslady:

kittymanada:

student-for-an-anarchist-society:

does anyone even need to say anything more about israel?

You bet your sweet ass if China or Iran was doing this reporters would be able to find the word “sterilization,” which is conspicuously absent here.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Again. Israel!

:(

If you defend Israel, I don’t need to know you.

FORCED STERILIZATION IS NOT OKAY. Please signal boost so that people realize that forced sterilization wasn’t just something that happened in the US in the ’70s, but that it’s still going on now and it’s eugenics.

(Source: priceofliberty)

disco-punk:

"For me, the issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept… Whenever people bring up feminism, I’m like, God. I’m just not really that interested." - Lana Del Rey

(Source: firepinks)

america-wakiewakie:

7 Actual Facts That Prove White Privilege Exists in America | Policy Mic
White privilege is a concept that far too many people misunderstand. These are the same people who argue that white privilege is made-up, that people of color and others who work to point out entrenched social injustice are just complainers.  
People of color aren’t unfairly discriminated against, the argument goes, they are just unwilling to work hard to get ahead. Or maybe it’s their “inner city" mentality, to quote Congressman Paul Ryan.
But despite the wrongheaded belief that people of color are bootstrap pullers, structural inequality dictates that some people are beginning life sans boots. Peggy McIntosh explains the concept of white privilege as an “invisible backpack" of unearned rights and privileges that white people enjoy. "Privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do," reads a quote commonly attributed to Peggy McIntosh. “Access to privilege doesn’t determine one’s outcomes, but it is definitely an asset that makes it more likely that whatever talent, ability, and aspirations a person with privilege has will result in something positive for them.”
Here are just a few of the things that are more or likely to be true if one happens to have been born white in America:

1. You are less likely to be arrested.

Research shows that white Americans are less likely to be arrested and jailed. While people of color only make up 30% of the total population, they are 60% of the U.S. prison population.
This discrepancy is particularly apparent when it comes to nonviolent drug offenses, where people of color are jailed at much higher rates, even though drug use in the white community is higher than in the African-American community. 
According to Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have much higher rates of arrests. While only 14% of black people use drugs regularly, 37% of those arrested for drugs are black. 
This trend holds true for children of color as well, who are more likely to be perceived as guilty. The so-called school-to-prison pipeline targets children of color, funnelling them into the criminal justice system early due to unfair zero tolerance policies in American schools.
"In Chicago, twenty-five young people were involved in [a] food fight in the cafeteria and instead of being punished by having to clean up the cafeteria, they were suspended from school and arrested," notes the Advancement Project.

2. You are more likely to get into college.

The White House recently launched a new initiative called, My Brother’s Keeper, aimed at increasing opportunities for boys and young men of color. A key component of the initiative is increasing the number of men of color who graduate from high school and get into college.
According to a 2013 report by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, elite educational institutions are a “passive agent” in perpetuating white privilege. The report found that white students are still overrepresented in the nation’s 468 elite institutions. Even though many white and minority students are unprepared for college in equal rates, more white students are admitted to universities.
"The higher education system is more and more complicit as a passive agent in the systematic reproduction of white racial privilege across generations," the Georgetown study noted. "Even among equally qualified white, African-American and Hispanic students, these pathways are not only separate but they bring unequal results."

3. You are more likely to “fit in” and get called back for a job.
Having a name perceived as “black” is a burden during a job search. In 2012, an unemployed black woman made headlines for reporting that her resume on Monster.com began to receive interest from employers after she changed her name and race. Yolanda Spivey, an insurance professional, noticed that Monster.com’s “diversity questionnaire” section seemed to be hurting her employment options. After Yolanda changed her name to the fictitious Bianca White, however, she received calls with job offers immediately. And not only that, they were for better jobs.
"More shocking was that some employers, mostly Caucasian-sounding women, were calling Bianca more than once, desperate to get an interview with her," Spivey wrote. "All along, my real Monster.com account was open and active; but, despite having the same background as Bianca, I received no phone calls. Two jobs actually did email me and Bianca at the same time. But they were commission only sales positions. Potential positions offering a competitive salary and benefits all went to Bianca."
(Read Full Text) (Follow Policy Mic)

america-wakiewakie:

7 Actual Facts That Prove White Privilege Exists in America | Policy Mic

White privilege is a concept that far too many people misunderstand. These are the same people who argue that white privilege is made-up, that people of color and others who work to point out entrenched social injustice are just complainers.  

People of color aren’t unfairly discriminated against, the argument goes, they are just unwilling to work hard to get ahead. Or maybe it’s their “inner city" mentality, to quote Congressman Paul Ryan.

But despite the wrongheaded belief that people of color are bootstrap pullers, structural inequality dictates that some people are beginning life sans boots. Peggy McIntosh explains the concept of white privilege as an “invisible backpack" of unearned rights and privileges that white people enjoy. "Privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do," reads a quote commonly attributed to Peggy McIntosh. “Access to privilege doesn’t determine one’s outcomes, but it is definitely an asset that makes it more likely that whatever talent, ability, and aspirations a person with privilege has will result in something positive for them.”

Here are just a few of the things that are more or likely to be true if one happens to have been born white in America:

1. You are less likely to be arrested.

Research shows that white Americans are less likely to be arrested and jailed. While people of color only make up 30% of the total population, they are 60% of the U.S. prison population.

This discrepancy is particularly apparent when it comes to nonviolent drug offenses, where people of color are jailed at much higher rates, even though drug use in the white community is higher than in the African-American community. 

According to Human Rights Watch, people of color are no more likely to use or sell illegal drugs than whites, but they have much higher rates of arrests. While only 14% of black people use drugs regularly, 37% of those arrested for drugs are black. 

This trend holds true for children of color as well, who are more likely to be perceived as guilty. The so-called school-to-prison pipeline targets children of color, funnelling them into the criminal justice system early due to unfair zero tolerance policies in American schools.

"In Chicago, twenty-five young people were involved in [a] food fight in the cafeteria and instead of being punished by having to clean up the cafeteria, they were suspended from school and arrested," notes the Advancement Project.

2. You are more likely to get into college.

The White House recently launched a new initiative called, My Brother’s Keeper, aimed at increasing opportunities for boys and young men of color. A key component of the initiative is increasing the number of men of color who graduate from high school and get into college.

According to a 2013 report by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, elite educational institutions are a “passive agent” in perpetuating white privilege. The report found that white students are still overrepresented in the nation’s 468 elite institutions. Even though many white and minority students are unprepared for college in equal rates, more white students are admitted to universities.

"The higher education system is more and more complicit as a passive agent in the systematic reproduction of white racial privilege across generations," the Georgetown study noted. "Even among equally qualified white, African-American and Hispanic students, these pathways are not only separate but they bring unequal results."

3. You are more likely to “fit in” and get called back for a job.

Having a name perceived as “black” is a burden during a job search. In 2012, an unemployed black woman made headlines for reporting that her resume on Monster.com began to receive interest from employers after she changed her name and race. Yolanda Spivey, an insurance professional, noticed that Monster.com’s “diversity questionnaire” section seemed to be hurting her employment options. After Yolanda changed her name to the fictitious Bianca White, however, she received calls with job offers immediately. And not only that, they were for better jobs.

"More shocking was that some employers, mostly Caucasian-sounding women, were calling Bianca more than once, desperate to get an interview with her," Spivey wrote. "All along, my real Monster.com account was open and active; but, despite having the same background as Bianca, I received no phone calls. Two jobs actually did email me and Bianca at the same time. But they were commission only sales positions. Potential positions offering a competitive salary and benefits all went to Bianca."

(Read Full Text) (Follow Policy Mic)

Anonymous asked
Why do you despise "new atheists"? That's kind of rude.

amodernmanifesto:

Their “intellectual” leaders have consistently sided with imperialism in the War on Terror, Hitchens supported the War on Iraq, Dawkins has actively supported colonialism, etc.

They spread islamophobic lies and distortions about Muslim people and participate in an enormous Orientalist-colonialist project, along with the Christian reactionaries, to demonise third world people as “irrational”.

Suffice to say, when you make an abstract critique of religion, based in a vulgar form of materialism that ends up supporting capitalist-imperialism and white supremacy, you are going to have a really hard time.

Watching the Boko Haram narrative change in real time

atane:

I have seen a lot being posted on social media and in the press about Boko Haram, and some of it is really astounding. I’ll list it what I’ve seen numerically, along with some thoughts.

1. Part of the narrative being shaped around Boko Haram in the western press is that they’re like…

Directors Insulting Each Other

crityrion:

1. Francois Truffaut on Michelangelo Antonioni:
“Antonioni is the only important director I have nothing good to say about. He bores me; he’s so solemn and humorless.”

2. Ingmar Bergman on Michelangelo Antonioni:
“Fellini, Kurosawa, and Bunuel move in the same field as…

Take boots, for example. [Vimes] earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while a poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

—Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms (via rascalbot)

This is how it is really expensive to be poor. 

(via everydayworldasproblematic)